Posts Tagged ‘betting on props’

Want to bet how long will a celebrity marriage last?

For those of you who enjoy or claim to be gambling enthusiasts and like betting on props, such as “When is Lindsay Lohan going to quit drugs?” or more related to the subject “When will the hottest celebrity couple is going to split? This might be pretty interesting: Apparently there is a mathematical equation that tells you the odds on how long a celebrity marriage will last.

Apparently a science writer for The New York Times, who claims to be and uber-geek (according to his own words) has taken the time to create an equation that, according to him, can answer the question of how a long a celebrity marriage can last. The writer is John Tierney, and he writes for the Findings column of the already mentioned newspaper, The New York Times.

Earlier on this decade, a man named Garth Sundem,  who is the author of Brain Trust: 93 Top Scientists Reveal Lab-Tested Secrets to Surfing, Dating, Dieting, Gambling, Growing Man-Eating Plants and More!, was one of the firsts (if not the first) to work on a similar equation back in 2006. The variables of his equation included level of fame and marital track records (wonder what could happen to those who have not been wed before or just struck fame…)

According to Tierney, in spite that his equation still needs a little work done, it was correct predicting the splits of several famous couples such as Demi Moore and Ashton Kutcher; Pamela Anderson and Kid Rock; and Britney Spears and Kevin Federline (that one, we could predict without a formula).

Among the tweaks and fixes still on the works for the formula, the previous equation measured fame by the number of Google hits, while the new version uses a ratio of the number of times a celebrity has been mentioned in the Times divided by the number of mentions in the National Enquirer. As you can see this new version is based on journalistic response, which makes us think the other might be a bit more accurate since it is actually based on what people look for and not what a newspaper decides to publish, however, Mr. Sundem, the original creator of the equation says “This is a major improvement in the equation…It turns out that overall fame doesn’t matter as much as the flavor of the fame. It’s tabloid fame that dooms you.” He has a good and valid point if you ask us.

Other variables that have been added to the equation are the spouses’ combined age, length of the courtship and, of course, the sex symbol factor,  which is defined as the number of Google hits showing the female part of the couple “in clothing designed to elicit libidinous intent.” Why not men too? Are they not considered sex symbols too?

So what do you think? Are you ready to place your bets on the longevity of a celebrity marriage? If you make friends with the creators of the equation you might get a better chance of boosting up your bankroll.

blog: thevirtualcasino.com